Baby Vaccination Schedule

image001Before childhood immunizations, many children were afflicted with serious childhood illnesses. Some cases of these illnesses caused severe disability or even death. Immunizing your child can help prevent or lessen the effects of these illnesses. Immunizations are a weakened form of the actual illness that will not make your child sick with the illness. When introduced to the child’s body, it will produce antibodies to fight off the illness if the child is exposed.

There are a few different types of vaccines, depending on which illness they prevent. Some are able to protect the body from ever catching an illness over an entire lifetime. Some will require follow-up or “booster shots” in order to keep a person immune. For example, Hepatitis B vaccines will offer a lifetime of protection is the entire course of shots are given. Tetanus, diphtheria and measles need “booster shots.”

Read on to learn what vaccines your child needs to receive at different times of their life and what diseases all these vaccines immunize against and most importantly, baby vaccination schedule.

Baby Vaccination Schedule By Disease Type 

Immunizations can help to reduce contagious or communicable illnesses. Childhood immunization schedules are put into place by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. The CDC monitors communicable illnesses in people such as; measles, mumps, rubella, influenza, etc.

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians endorses these schedules and assists doctors in educating parents on when to vaccinate their children. If you have not vaccinated your child according to recommended dates, your pediatrician can help you get caught up on them. Here is a list of childhood illnesses and when the vaccinations are given:

Disease

When To Get It

DTaP (Protects against Diphtheria, Tetanus, acellular Pertussis)

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months
  • 15 to 18 months (12 months if 6 months has passed after the previous shot)
  • 4 to 6 years
  • 11 to 12 years (TDaP Booster)

Hepatitis A (Protects against Hepatitis A/Liver Disease)

  • 12 months
  • 23 months

Two-shot series 6 to 18 months apart

Hepatitis B (Hepatitis B/Liver Disease)

  • Birth
  • 1 to 2 months of age
  • 6 to 18 months of age

HiB (Haemophilis Influenza – complications include pneumonia, epiglottitis and meningitis)

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months ( May be omitted if the Pedivax HiB or Combivax is given at 2 and 4 months of age)
  • 12 to 15 months

HPV (Protects against Human Papilloma Virus – Cause of genital warts and certain reproductive cancers)

  • 3 doses at 11 to 12 years of age for boys and girls

Influenza Vaccine (Protects against classic influenza and H1N1 Swine Flu)

  • 6 months to 2 years Flu shot
  • Over two years may receive nasal spray
  • Given in the early fall to winter months
  • Most children benefit from one dose
  • Children 6 months to 8 years old need two doses if first time for vaccination.

Meningococcal (Protects against bacterial meningitis in children and teenagers)

  • 11 to 12 years of age
  • 16 years (Booster shot)

MMR (Against Measles, Mumps, Rubella)

  • 12 to 15 months of age
  • 4 to 6 years of age

Pneumococcal (PCV –protects against pneumococcal infection that can lead to pneumonia, ear infections and meningitis)

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months
  • 12 to 15 months

Polio (IPV –Inactivated Polio Virus to protect against polio which can cause paralysis)

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 to 18 months
  • 4 to 6 years

Rotavirus (an oral vaccine to protect against this virus which causes severe diarrhea, vomiting, dehydration and fever)

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months (Last shot not needed if child received the Rotarix vaccine for first two shots.)

Varicella (Protects against chicken pox)

  • 12 to 15 months
  • 4 to 6 years (Booster)

Baby Vaccination Schedule By Age 

Birth to 5 Years

Baby Age

Vaccines Offered

Notes

Birth

  • BCG
  • OPV (Polio)
  • Hepatitis B

BCG -Tuberculosis – not commonly given in U.S.

OPV – Oral polio Dose 1 – not given in U.S.

Hepatitis B Dose 1

6 to 8 Weeks

  • DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis)
  • HIB (Haemophilis Influenza Type B)
  • PCV (Pneumococcal Vaccine)
  • Rotavirus
  • OPV (Oral Polio Vaccine)
  • Hepatitis B

DTaP – Dose 1

HIB – Dose 1

PCV – Dose 1

Rotavirus – Dose 1

OPV – Dose 2 (In U.S. IPV shot 1 is given)

Hep B – Dose 2

*DTaP, HIB and IPV are available in a combination shot.

10 to 16 Weeks

  • DTaP
  • HIB
  • PCV
  • Rotavirus
  • OPV

DTaP - Dose 2

HIB – Dose 2

PCV – Dose 2

Rotavirus – Dose 2

OPV – Dose 3 (In U.S. IPV shot will be given Dose 2)

*DTaP, HIB and IPV are available in a combination shot.

14 to 24 Weeks

  • DTaP
  • HIB
  • PCV
  • Rotavirus
  • OPV

 

DTaP – Dose 3

HIB – Dose 3

PCV – Dose 3

Rotavirus – Dose 3

OPV – Dose 4 (In U.S. IPV shot Dose 3)

*DTaP, HIB and IPV are available in a combination shot.

6 Months

  • Influenza

Dose 1 (Optional, but highly recommended)

7 to 8 Months

  • Influenza

Dose 2 (After the first two doses, one shot is given every year during the fall or winter months.)

9 to 12 Months

  • Measles
  • OPV

Measles may be combined with Mumps and Rubella

OPV – Dose 5

12 to 18 Months

  • Varicella (Chicken Pox)
  • Hepatitis A

Varicella - Dose 1

Hepatitis A - Dose 1

15 to 18 Months

  • MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella)
  • HIB
  • DTaP

HIB – Booster

DTaP – Booster 1

18 to 24 Months

  • OPV
  • Hepatitis A

OPV – Booster 1

Hepatitis A – Dose 2

2 Years

  • Typhoid
  • Meningococcal Meningitis

Typhoid is a respiratory illness and spread via food and water. Not common in U.S. – Dose 1

4 to 5 Years

  • Typhoid
  • OPV
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella)
  • DTaP
  • Varicella

Typhoid - Dose 2

OPV – Booster 2

MMR – Booster

DTaP – Booster

Varicella – Dose 2

For Teens

11 to 12 Years

  • HPV (Human Papilloma Virus)
  • DTaP
  • Meningococcal

HPV - For males and females. 3 Doses over 6 month period.

DTaP – Booster

Meningococcal - Booster

College Students

  • Meningococcal

Highly recommended for college kids entering campus housing environments.

watch the following video in which a mom shares her baby’s vaccination schedule:

Notes: Vaccination schedules differ from country to country and also from year to year depending on outbreaks of certain childhood illnesses. It is important to stay current on any new recommendations.

Watch a video for more information on baby vaccination scheduleļ¼š

When choosing to vaccinate your child, you may hear many different thoughts on vaccinations from parents who are either for or against vaccinations. Education on the actual illnesses can help you make the best possible decision for you and your child.